Disaster Relief Grants

CDBG Disaster Funding through Arkansas Economic Development Commission:  Funding can become available in result of a presidentially declared disaster with funds from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development available through the state’s Community Development Block Grant Program.  All cities and counties in Arkansas that have been affected by a presidential disaster are eligible applicants.  However, as with all CDBG projects all projects must meet one of the three national objectives:  Benefit to low or moderate income persons, elimination of conditions of slum or blight or address an imminent threat to the health and welfare of the community. 

Most recent Disaster Relief Projects funded are;

  • Conway County Generator
  • Dardanelle Generator
  • Knoxville Generator
  • Montgomery County Generator

For more information and assistance with the Disaster Relief Grants through Arkansas Economic Development Commission, district members may contactVicki Anderson, Community Grants Coordinator, vanderson@wcapdd.org or 501-525-7577 ext 1003

The Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) can assist communities in addressing long-term disaster relief and recovery needs. Through competitive grants to eligible applicants, EDA’s disaster recovery generally falls within three categories:

  • Strategic Planning and Technical Assistance
  • Infrastructure Design and Development
  • Capital for Alternative Financing

For more information and assistance with Disaster Relief Grants through the Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration, district members may contact Vicki Anderson, Program Manager, vanderson@wcapdd.org, or 501-525-7577 ext 1003.

FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance

HMA programs provide funding for eligible activities that are consistent with the National Mitigation Framework’s Long-Term Vulnerability Reduction capability. HMA programs reduce community vulnerability to disasters and their effects, promote individual and community safety and resilience, and promote community vitality after an incident. Furthermore, HMA programs reduce response and recovery resource requirements in the wake of a disaster or incident, which results in a safer community that is less reliant on external financial assistance.

Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP)

The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) provides grants to States and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration. The purpose of the HMGP is to reduce the loss of life and property due to natural disasters and to enable mitigation measures to be implemented during the immediate recovery from a disaster. Unlike the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) more familiar disaster assistance programs that help pay for the permanent repair and restoration of existing facilities, the HMGP goes beyond simply fixing the damage. The HMGP will, within the limits of state and federal guidelines, help fund a wide range of new projects that reduce hazard vulnerability and the potential of future damage. The State of Arkansas, through the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management (ADEM), administers the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). (Section 404 of Public Law 93-288, as amended, the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act).

What Types Of Projects Can Be Funded By The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program? 
Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds may be used to fund projects that will reduce or eliminate the losses from future disasters. Projects must provide a long-term solution to a problem, for example, elevation of a home to reduce the risk of flood damages as opposed to buying sandbags and pumps to fight the flood. In addition, a project’s potential savings must be more than the cost of implementing the project. Funds may be used to protect either public or private property or to purchase property that has been subjected to, or is in danger of, repetitive damage. Examples of projects include, but are not limited to: Acquisition of real property for willing sellers and demolition or relocation of buildings to convert the property to open space use, Retrofitting structures and facilities to minimize damages from high winds, earthquake, flood, wildfire, or other natural hazards, Elevation of flood prone structures, Development and initial implementation of vegetative management programs, Minor flood control projects that do not duplicate the flood prevention activities of other federal agencies Localized flood control projects, such as certain ring levees and floodwall systems, that are designed specifically to protect critical facilities, and Post-disaster building code related activities that support building code officials during the reconstruction process.

Who is Eligible to Apply? 
Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding is only available to applicants that reside within a Presidentially declared disaster area. Eligible applicants include: State and local governments Indian tribes or other tribal organizations Certain non-profit organizations Individual homeowners and businesses may not apply directly to the program; however a community may apply on their behalf.

Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program (PDM)

PDM is authorized by the Stafford Act, 42 U.S.C. 5133. PDM is designed to assist States, territories, federally-recognized tribes, and local communities to implement a sustained pre- disaster natural hazard mitigation program to reduce overall risk to the population and structures from future hazard events, while also reducing reliance on Federal funding in future disasters. Congressional appropriations provide the funding for PDM

The total amount of funds distributed for PDM is determined once the appropriation is provided for a given fiscal year. It can be used for mitigation projects and planning activities. 

Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant program (FMA)

FMA is authorized by Section 1366 of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as amended (NFIA), 42 U.S.C. 4104c, with the goal of reducing or eliminating claims under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FMA was created as part of the National Flood Insurance Reform Act (NFIRA) of 1994. The Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (Public Law 112-141) consolidated the Repetitive Flood Claims and Severe Repetitive Loss grant programs into FMAFMA funding is available through the National Flood Insurance Fund (NFIF) for flood hazard mitigation projects as well as plan development and is appropriated by Congress. States, territories, and federally-recognized tribes are eligible to apply for FMAfunds. Local governments are considered subapplicants and must apply to their Applicant State, territory, or federally-recognized tribe.

For more information and assistance contact Cody Shreve, Program Manager, cshreve@wcapdd.org or 501-525-7577 ext 1002.

Continuity of Operations Planning

The ACOOP effort has focused state entity energy and resources on developing plans to minimize the impact of natural and man-made disasters on state operations. Reviews of the work completed thus far make it clear that plan development is only the start of the process. In order to ensure long-term effectiveness, these plans must be continually tested, lessons learned must be institutionalized, and recommendations for improvements must be supported and adopted. The key to the success of this program is establishing a state government culture where our leadership and staff are aware of the need to plan, accept responsibility for ensuring the continuity of essential state services, and are actively involved in refining and following an ongoing, repeatable program methodology.

For more information and assistance in preparing a Arkansas Continuity of Operations Plan contact Cody Shreve, Program Manager, cshreve@wcapdd.org or 501-525-7577 ext 1002,Darian Piper Community Grant Specialist, dpiper@wcapdd.org or 501-525-7577 ext 1008